Rapport de I IFES sur la Mission de son Consultant Juridique en Guinee

Publication Date: 
31 Dec 1990

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OVERVIEW

The Mission

During the summer of 1991, the Government of Guinea addressed a request to the Government of the United States for assistance with the preparation of its Election Law. At about the same time, the Government of Guinea addressed another request to the Government of Canada, asking that a legal expert be sent to Conakry to review the drafts of a number of organic laws that would complement the recently adopted Fundamental Law (Constitution) of Guinea.

On the basis of discussions involving the Governments of the United States and Canada, as well as their respective embassies in Guinea, it was decided that the two requests  would be handled together by a bilingual Canadian public servant with expertise in electoral matters and other areas of public law.  This official would act as a consultant to the International Foundation for Electoral Systems and would go to Guinea with a mandate from IFES. The consultant was selected from the staff of Elections Canada. He went to Guinea from October 28 until November 12, 1991.

Throughout his Stay in Guinea, the consultant was helped in material respects, and with information and advice, by the embassies of Canada and the United States. Given local circumstances, the mission could not have been carried out without this support. IFES therefore expresses its appreciation to the ambassadors and diplomatic staff involved for this cooperation.

The consultant was also most cordially received by all members of the Guinean administration with whom he had dealings.  In particular, members of the Conseil Transitoire de Redressement National, the CTRN, were receptive to the consultant’s presence in their midst and engaged in a full and free exchange of ideas with him.  IFES therefore also extends its gratitude to the Guinean authorities for the welcome they gave its consultant and for their high regard and repeated thanks for his advice.

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